School Detention and Suspension: How to Reduce Recidivism

//School Detention and Suspension: How to Reduce Recidivism

School Detention and Suspension: How to Reduce Recidivism

When a student got detention twenty years ago, they would basically just sit in the principal’s office or an empty classroom, doing “busy work”, or worse, nothing at all.

Today, nothing has changed.

Students are usually still sitting there doing nothing during detention or suspension, getting further and further behind in class. To some students, detention is a welcomed reprieve, time they could sit idly with nothing to do. Sometimes they have their headphones on, listening to music, or even playing Fortnite on their phone.

Its probably no surprise to you that this model does not work in reducing repeat incidents. Since there is really no pain or discomfort in detention, many students will simply repeat- or escalate poor behavior rather than learn something from detention that encourages them NOT to repeat the behavior.

That’s the paradigm shift we’re seeing today in the world of detention and suspension.

Today, students who commit an infraction and have detention or suspension have to go through a web-based lesson related to the infraction. If they are disrespectful in class, they will go through a thirty minute lesson on respect. If they are fighting with or bullying another student, they will go through a lesson related to the incident. At the end of the lesson, the student will also complete a reflection summary, describing what they learned from the experience and how it may have affected others. Finally, the student will sign a pledge, promising to make better behavioral choices in the future.

Today, it is so much more meaningful and impactful to upload a student in a lesson related to their infraction.

Not only does the lesson provide intervention and restorative justice, it’s also a natural deterrent for students to not repeat the behavior. Students who have gone through these lesson have said, “I don’t want to have to go through that again.”

To learn more about how to use intervention and restorative justice lessons for students in detention/suspension, check out ISS360.

When a student got detention twenty years ago, they would basically just sit in the principal’s office or an empty classroom, doing “busy work”, or worse, nothing at all.

Today, nothing has changed.

Students are usually still sitting there doing nothing during detention or suspension, getting further and further behind in class. To some students, detention is a welcomed reprieve, time they could sit idly with nothing to do. Sometimes they have their headphones on, listening to music, or even playing Fortnite on their phone.

Its probably no surprise to you that this model does not work in reducing repeat incidents. Since there is really no pain or discomfort in detention, many students will simply repeat- or escalate poor behavior rather than learn something from detention that encourages them NOT to repeat the behavior.

That’s the paradigm shift we’re seeing today in the world of detention and suspension.

Today, students who commit an infraction and have detention or suspension have to go through a web-based lesson related to the infraction. If they are disrespectful in class, they will go through a thirty minute lesson on respect. If they are fighting with or bullying another student, they will go through a lesson related to the incident. At the end of the lesson, the student will also complete a reflection summary, describing what they learned from the experience and how it may have affected others. Finally, the student will sign a pledge, promising to make better behavioral choices in the future.

Today, it is so much more meaningful and impactful to upload a student in a lesson related to their infraction.

Not only does the lesson provide intervention and restorative justice, it’s also a natural deterrent for students to not repeat the behavior. Students who have gone through these lesson have said, “I don’t want to have to go through that again.”

To learn more about how to use intervention and restorative justice lessons for students in detention/suspension, check out ISS360.

By | 2018-06-26T02:42:05+00:00 June 25th, 2018|Blog|Comments Off on School Detention and Suspension: How to Reduce Recidivism

About the Author:

Peter Kraft
Peter Kraft has spent his career developing products that engage students, student-athletes and their parents while helping high schools and colleges achieve their objectives. He is Co-Founder and Managing Director at Evolution Labs.

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